Tag Archives: simplicity

Why should we all suffer an interface that is unusable?

“If you want to reach the greatest number of users possible, it’s best to write clearly and simply and design your interfaces to be consistent from page to page. For some people, simple usability advice like this is an absolute accessibility need... And anyway, people of all abilities fail tasks that are confusing. Why should we all suffer an interface that proves itself to be unusable?” - Matt May

“If you want to reach the greatest number of users possible, it’s best to write clearly and simply and design your interfaces to be consistent from page to page. For some people, simple usability advice like this is an absolute accessibility need… And anyway, people of all abilities fail tasks that are confusing. Why should we all suffer an interface that proves itself to be unusable?” – Matt May

Read Matt’s article “Accessibility From the Ground Up” from Digital Web Magazine for his thoughts on creating accessible designs.

Don’t lose sight of the founding elements of customer experience

“It’s easy to forget, in a world of incredible possibility and infinite creativity, the power of simplicity and the importance of a solid customer experience foundation. This is especially true related to online user experience... As we look forward in anticipation of what’s to come, it’s important not to lose sight of managing the founding elements of customer experience.” - Leigh Duncan

“It’s easy to forget, in a world of incredible possibility and infinite creativity, the power of simplicity and the importance of a solid customer experience foundation. This is especially true related to online user experience… As we look forward in anticipation of what’s to come, it’s important not to lose sight of managing the founding elements of customer experience.” – Leigh Duncan

Read Leigh’s article “Five Experience Fundamentals” from gotomedia for her proposed founding elements of customer experience.

Design things that maintain the pleasure of accomplishment

“The argument is not between adding features and simplicity, between adding capability and usability. The real issue is about design: designing things that have the power required for the job while maintaining understandability, the feeling of control, and the pleasure of accomplishment.” – Don Norman

Read Don’s article “Simplicity is Not the Answer” for more thoughts on the importance of making understandable designs.

Treat your audience less like a faceless user and more like a human being

“The principles of good human-to-computer interface design are simplicity, support, clarity, encouragement, satisfaction, accessibility, versatility, and personalization. While it’s essential to heed these, it’s also important to empathize with and inspire your audience so they feel you’re treating them less like a faceless user and more like a human being.” - Sharon Lee

“The principles of good human-to-computer interface design are simplicity, support, clarity, encouragement, satisfaction, accessibility, versatility, and personalization. While it’s essential to heed these, it’s also important to empathize with and inspire your audience so they feel you’re treating them less like a faceless user and more like a human being.” – Sharon Lee

Read Sharon’s article “Human-to-Human Design” or check out two other quotes from this article: “Your site can encapsulate your brand personality” and “Rich, sensory experiences immerse users and lead to joy and satisfaction.”

Designers need to be very careful about the lure of complexity

“As web designers, we need to be very careful about the lure of complexity. We should not fall into the trap of thinking that if it’s hard to design, it must be good; that if it’s using the latest technology, it must be good; that if all our friends think it’s really cool, it must be good.” - Gerry McGovern

Read Gerry’s article “Achieving greater simplicity involves managing increasing complexity” for his thoughts on the importance of reducing complexity. Gerry McGovern provides website content management solutions.

The goal of human-centered design is to tame complexity

The world is complex, and so too must be the activities that we perform. But that doesn’t mean that we must live in continual frustration. No. The whole point of human-centered design is to tame complexity, to turn what would appear to be a complicated tool into one that fits the task, that is understandable, usable, enjoyable. - Don Norman

“The world is complex, and so too must be the activities that we perform. But that doesn’t mean that we must live in continual frustration. No. The whole point of human-centered design is to tame complexity, to turn what would appear to be a complicated tool into one that fits the task, that is understandable, usable, enjoyable.” – Don Norman

Read Don’s article “Simplicity Is Not The Answer” for his thoughts on why simplicity should not necessarily be the primary goal when creating products and services.