Tag Archives: people

Focus on what you should be doing, not just what you can

“Technological advances have always been driven more by a mind-set of ‘I can’ than ‘I should’... Technologists love to cram maximum functionality into their products. That’s ‘I can’ thinking, which is driven by peer competition and market forces... But this approach ignores the far more important question of how the consumer will actually use the device... focus on what we should be doing, not just what we can.” - John Maeda

“Technological advances have always been driven more by a mind-set of ‘I can’ than ‘I should’… Technologists love to cram maximum functionality into their products. That’s ‘I can’ thinking, which is driven by peer competition and market forces… But this approach ignores the far more important question of how the consumer will actually use the device… focus on what we should be doing, not just what we can.” – John Maeda

Read John’s “mini manifesto” in this article from Esquire.  Thanks to Experientia for sharing this story.

Making assumptions about our users leads us to design for ourselves

“In the absence of detailed information, we all work from assumptions about who the user is, what he or she does, and what type of system would meet his or her needs. Following these assumptions, we tend to design for ourselves, not for other people.” - Human Factor: Designing Computer Systems for People by Richard Rubinstein and Harry Hersh

“In the absence of detailed information, we all work from assumptions about who the user is, what he or she does, and what type of system would meet his or her needs. Following these assumptions, we tend to design for ourselves, not for other people.” – Human Factor: Designing Computer Systems for People by Richard Rubinstein and Harry Hersh

Quote submitted by Kel Smith.  Do you have a quote you want to see on inspireUX? Submit it, and it may be chosen!

Purchase Human Factor: Designing Computer Systems for People here.

UX is a conversation between people separated over the distance of time

“I view a user experience as a conversation between people separated over the distance of time. At one end of that conversation are those who create the product; at the other, the people who use it. In between is the product itself—with a design that either helps or hinders; creates a barrier-free interaction or shouts in an unfamiliar language. Because this conversation does not happen in real time, we are not there to smooth over the rough spots and make sure that we have spoken clearly. Instead, we have to build our understanding of those users into every aspect of the design, by putting people—users—at the center of the design process.” - Whitney Quesenbery

“I view a user experience as a conversation between people separated over the distance of time. At one end of that conversation are those who create the product; at the other, the people who use it. In between is the product itself—with a design that either helps or hinders; creates a barrier-free interaction or shouts in an unfamiliar language. Because this conversation does not happen in real time, we are not there to smooth over the rough spots and make sure that we have spoken clearly. Instead, we have to build our understanding of those users into every aspect of the design, by putting people—users—at the center of the design process.” – Whitney Quesenbery

This quote is from Whitney’s great article “Why People Matter” from UX Matters.

Tip: Remember, you can always click on the thumbnail image of the quote card to get a full-sized image that can be used for saving or printing.

Without sacrificing usability, let’s bring a little fun into our designs

“It’s standard practice to design with our user’s goals in mind. Too often, though, we tend to focus only on the immediate goals... Although we may produce usable and successful designs, we have ignored the user’s larger context. They may be bored, tired, at work, grinding away at a long term deliverable. They may be entering countless rows of data into a spreadsheet.  People love to have fun. Without sacrificing usability, let’s bring a little fun into our designs.” - Loren Baxter

“It’s standard practice to design with our user’s goals in mind. Too often, though, we tend to focus only on the immediate goals… Although we may produce usable and successful designs, we have ignored the user’s larger context. They may be bored, tired, at work, grinding away at a long term deliverable. They may be entering countless rows of data into a spreadsheet.  People love to have fun. Without sacrificing usability, let’s bring a little fun into our designs.” – Loren Baxter

Read Loren’s article “Fun in Interaction Design” here.

Take the time to really understand your users the best you can

“We all like to think of ourselves as user centric designers, but exactly how much effort do you put into knowing your users before beginning the design process? Take the time to really understand them the best you can... Understanding your users not only improves the quality of your work, but also helps move the discussion away from the personal preferences of the client, to the people who’s opinion really matters.” - Paul Boag

“We all like to think of ourselves as user centric designers, but exactly how much effort do you put into knowing your users before beginning the design process? Take the time to really understand them the best you can… Understanding your users not only improves the quality of your work, but also helps move the discussion away from the personal preferences of the client, to the people who’s opinion really matters.” – Paul Boag

Read Paul’s article “10 Ways To Get Design Approval” for his thoughts on how you can help to ensure that the design you produce is the one that gets built.

Design’s true purpose is to improve people’s lives

“Design has a social function and its true purpose is to improve people's lives.” - Nokia Design Manifesto

“Design has a social function and its true purpose is to improve people’s lives.” – Nokia Design Manifesto

Browse through the first edition of Nokia’s Design Manifesto (pdf) for many inspiring thoughts about design, or read another quote from the manifesto.