Tag Archives: interface

Create a meaningful conversation with your users by engaging them on a personal level

“There will always be a need for dialogue, and if we are to have a meaningful conversation with our users, we have to facilitate the conversation with an interface that welcomes them with open arms... By asking users to engage on a personal level, we are creating a relationship based on shared ownership of knowledge and value. And best of all, it doesn’t feel like work. Actions really do speak louder than words.” - Zeus Jones

“There will always be a need for dialogue, and if we are to have a meaningful conversation with our users, we have to facilitate the conversation with an interface that welcomes them with open arms… By asking users to engage on a personal level, we are creating a relationship based on shared ownership of knowledge and value. And best of all, it doesn’t feel like work. Actions really do speak louder than words.” – Zeus Jones

Read more from Zeus in his excellent article “Conversational UX Design.”

Thanks to Konigi for posting about this article!

Reminder: Click on the quote thumbnails to view a larger version suitable for saving or printing.

Intuitive design lets you keep your attention on what you’re trying to accomplish

“A design is intuitive when people just know what to do and they don’t have to go through any training to get there... When a design is not intuitive, our attention moves away from what we’re trying to accomplish to how we can get the interface to accomplish what we want.” - Jared Spool

“A design is intuitive when people just know what to do and they don’t have to go through any training to get there… When a design is not intuitive, our attention moves away from what we’re trying to accomplish to how we can get the interface to accomplish what we want.” – Jared Spool

This quote is from Jared’s excellent presentation entitled “What Makes a Design Seem Intuitive?” given at the joint PhillyCHI and UsabilityNJ meeting on July 15, 2009.

Read more quotes from Jared.

Why should we all suffer an interface that is unusable?

“If you want to reach the greatest number of users possible, it’s best to write clearly and simply and design your interfaces to be consistent from page to page. For some people, simple usability advice like this is an absolute accessibility need... And anyway, people of all abilities fail tasks that are confusing. Why should we all suffer an interface that proves itself to be unusable?” - Matt May

“If you want to reach the greatest number of users possible, it’s best to write clearly and simply and design your interfaces to be consistent from page to page. For some people, simple usability advice like this is an absolute accessibility need… And anyway, people of all abilities fail tasks that are confusing. Why should we all suffer an interface that proves itself to be unusable?” – Matt May

Read Matt’s article “Accessibility From the Ground Up” from Digital Web Magazine for his thoughts on creating accessible designs.

Create deep connections between users and their technology

“As we explore new human interface devices and incorporate new interactions into our designs, we have the opportunity to create deep connections between users and their technology.” – Jonathan Follett

Read Jonathan’s article “Toward a More Human Interface Device: Integrating the Virtual and Physical” for his thoughts on how input devices impact experience.

A coherent product user interface is the product to users

“Features are meaningless. They mean nothing to users. A coherent product user interface is the product to users.” - Kim Goodwin

“Features are meaningless. They mean nothing to users. A coherent product user interface is the product to users.” – Kim Goodwin

Read Pabini Gabriel-Petit’s recap of Kim Goodwin’s 2005 BayCHI talk, “Getting Your Design Built” for Kim’s thoughts on how to get buy-in for designs and ensuring that they get built

Treat your audience less like a faceless user and more like a human being

“The principles of good human-to-computer interface design are simplicity, support, clarity, encouragement, satisfaction, accessibility, versatility, and personalization. While it’s essential to heed these, it’s also important to empathize with and inspire your audience so they feel you’re treating them less like a faceless user and more like a human being.” - Sharon Lee

“The principles of good human-to-computer interface design are simplicity, support, clarity, encouragement, satisfaction, accessibility, versatility, and personalization. While it’s essential to heed these, it’s also important to empathize with and inspire your audience so they feel you’re treating them less like a faceless user and more like a human being.” – Sharon Lee

Read Sharon’s article “Human-to-Human Design” or check out two other quotes from this article: “Your site can encapsulate your brand personality” and “Rich, sensory experiences immerse users and lead to joy and satisfaction.”