Tag Archives: design

Designers should vow to produce things that are meaningful additions to the world

“In an ideal world, social responsibility would be a prerequisite for design, and designers would vow to produce beautiful, useful, positive, responsible, functional, and economical things and concepts that are meaningful additions to—or sometimes subtractions from—the world we live in. Indeed, design deserves such thoughtful consideration.” - Paola Antonelli

“In an ideal world, social responsibility would be a prerequisite for design, and designers would vow to produce beautiful, useful, positive, responsible, functional, and economical things and concepts that are meaningful additions to—or sometimes subtractions from—the world we live in. Indeed, design deserves such thoughtful consideration.” – Paola Antonelli

Read more from Paola, senior curator of design and architecture at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, in her article “Core Principles” from Seed Magazine.

Thanks to @nonperishable and @21xdesign for sharing this article on Twitter!

One of the roles of design is to bring humanity, intelligence and beauty to the world of business

“I’ve come to believe strongly that one of the roles of design is to bring humanity, intelligence and beauty to the world of business, and indeed to everyday life. In my experience, good clients and good designers don’t see this goal as being opposed to—or even separate from—achieving business goals, but rather an integral part of it.” - Michael Bierut

“I’ve come to believe strongly that one of the roles of design is to bring humanity, intelligence and beauty to the world of business, and indeed to everyday life. In my experience, good clients and good designers don’t see this goal as being opposed to—or even separate from—achieving business goals, but rather an integral part of it.” – Michael Bierut

Read more from Michael in his 2006 interview with Peter Merholz from Adaptive Path.

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Designers don’t actually “solve” problems. They “work through” them.

“Designers don’t actually ‘solve’ problems. They ‘work through’ them. They use non-logical processes that are difficult to express in words but easier to express in action. They use models, mockups, sketches, and stories as their vocabulary. They operate in the space between knowing and doing, prototyping new solutions that arise from their four strengths of empathy, intuition, imagination, and idealism.” - The Designful Company by Marty Neumeier

“Designers don’t actually ‘solve’ problems. They ‘work through’ them. They use non-logical processes that are difficult to express in words but easier to express in action. They use models, mockups, sketches, and stories as their vocabulary. They operate in the space between knowing and doing, prototyping new solutions that arise from their four strengths of empathy, intuition, imagination, and idealism.” – The Designful Company by Marty Neumeier

Check out Marty’s book The Designful Company for his thoughts on “how to build a culture of nonstop innovation.”

Sites that embrace natural elegance add an element of personal feeling

“Natural elegance deals with the ‘feel’ a website or application expresses through its behavior over time, and which is rooted in the rules of order that govern nature... It’s possible to create perfectly pleasing websites by focusing only on formal, structural, and logical elegance. But those sites that embrace [natural] elegance feel to users like living beings who speak meaningful words; they are the marriage of form, function, pleasing content, and personal feeling.” - David Sherwin

“Natural elegance deals with the ‘feel’ a website or application expresses through its behavior over time, and which is rooted in the rules of order that govern nature… It’s possible to create perfectly pleasing websites by focusing only on formal, structural, and logical elegance. But those sites that embrace [natural] elegance feel to users like living beings who speak meaningful words; they are the marriage of form, function, pleasing content, and personal feeling.” – David Sherwin

This quote is from David’s A List Apart article “The Elegance of Imperfection”.

Designers understand the interrelationships that factor into success or failure

“Savvy design strategists, design researchers, and designers not only seek to deeply understand the client’s business and the end user’s needs of the product, but they also try to deeply understand the connected (and not so connected) interrelationships that factor into the success or failure of the potential offering.” - Tom Dair

“Savvy design strategists, design researchers, and designers not only seek to deeply understand the client’s business and the end user’s needs of the product, but they also try to deeply understand the connected (and not so connected) interrelationships that factor into the success or failure of the potential offering.” – Tom Dair

Read more about how a hollistic view of design can help solve problems through Tom’s excellent story about designing a toaster in his article “A Design Parable: The Toaster and the Toast.”

Design is more than the aesthetic. Design is fundamentally more.

“Design has been viewed as being aesthetic. Design equals How Something Looks. You see this attitude to design in every part of society—clothing design to interior design, less so in product design, and yes, in web design.... I think design covers so much more than the aesthetic. Design is fundamentally more. Design is usability. It is Information Architecture. It is Accessibility. This is all design." - Mark Boulton

“Design has been viewed as being aesthetic. Design equals How Something Looks. You see this attitude to design in every part of society—clothing design to interior design, less so in product design, and yes, in web design…. I think design covers so much more than the aesthetic. Design is fundamentally more. Design is usability. It is Information Architecture. It is Accessibility. This is all design.” – Mark Boulton

Read more from Mark in his 2005 article “Turning the corner: Designing for Web 2.0.