Tag Archives: accessibility

Design is more than the aesthetic. Design is fundamentally more.

“Design has been viewed as being aesthetic. Design equals How Something Looks. You see this attitude to design in every part of society—clothing design to interior design, less so in product design, and yes, in web design.... I think design covers so much more than the aesthetic. Design is fundamentally more. Design is usability. It is Information Architecture. It is Accessibility. This is all design." - Mark Boulton

“Design has been viewed as being aesthetic. Design equals How Something Looks. You see this attitude to design in every part of society—clothing design to interior design, less so in product design, and yes, in web design…. I think design covers so much more than the aesthetic. Design is fundamentally more. Design is usability. It is Information Architecture. It is Accessibility. This is all design.” – Mark Boulton

Read more from Mark in his 2005 article “Turning the corner: Designing for Web 2.0.

Why should we all suffer an interface that is unusable?

“If you want to reach the greatest number of users possible, it’s best to write clearly and simply and design your interfaces to be consistent from page to page. For some people, simple usability advice like this is an absolute accessibility need... And anyway, people of all abilities fail tasks that are confusing. Why should we all suffer an interface that proves itself to be unusable?” - Matt May

“If you want to reach the greatest number of users possible, it’s best to write clearly and simply and design your interfaces to be consistent from page to page. For some people, simple usability advice like this is an absolute accessibility need… And anyway, people of all abilities fail tasks that are confusing. Why should we all suffer an interface that proves itself to be unusable?” – Matt May

Read Matt’s article “Accessibility From the Ground Up” from Digital Web Magazine for his thoughts on creating accessible designs.

The measure of quality in web design should be graceful transformation

“The measure of quality in web design should not be good looks, but graceful transformation: pages that can be accessed under different conditions and keep their integrity... A real web designer embraces the medium and designs for maximum inclusivity.” - Sarah Horton

“The measure of quality in web design should not be good looks, but graceful transformation: pages that can be accessed under different conditions and keep their integrity… A real web designer embraces the medium and designs for maximum inclusivity.” – Sarah Horton

Read Sarah’s article “Beauty is Only Screen Deep” for her thoughts on why design should be about more than just good looks.

Treat your audience less like a faceless user and more like a human being

“The principles of good human-to-computer interface design are simplicity, support, clarity, encouragement, satisfaction, accessibility, versatility, and personalization. While it’s essential to heed these, it’s also important to empathize with and inspire your audience so they feel you’re treating them less like a faceless user and more like a human being.” - Sharon Lee

“The principles of good human-to-computer interface design are simplicity, support, clarity, encouragement, satisfaction, accessibility, versatility, and personalization. While it’s essential to heed these, it’s also important to empathize with and inspire your audience so they feel you’re treating them less like a faceless user and more like a human being.” – Sharon Lee

Read Sharon’s article “Human-to-Human Design” or check out two other quotes from this article: “Your site can encapsulate your brand personality” and “Rich, sensory experiences immerse users and lead to joy and satisfaction.”

Become an advocate for accessibility and everyone’s experience

“As the advocates for user experience I think it’s important that we’re advocating for everyone’s experience and perhaps doing a little bit more than just whispering the word ‘accessibility’ in a meeting early on and allowing it to be just as easily dismissed. And not just because of the potential legal implications, but because it’s our job.” - Leisa Reichelt

“As the advocates for user experience I think it’s important that we’re advocating for everyone’s experience and perhaps doing a little bit more than just whispering the word ‘accessibility’ in a meeting early on and allowing it to be just as easily dismissed. And not just because of the potential legal implications, but because it’s our job.” – Leisa Reichelt

Read Leisa’s article “Are you giving accessibility the consideration it deserves in the user experience?” for her thoughts on why accessibility is part of your responsibility as a UX designer.