UX Quotes

People Quotes

Author Quote
Aaron Irizarry “The more we listen to and try to understand what are clients/users are looking for, we can refine our products, and processes in an effort to keep them engaged, and appeal to potential users and clients. With our users in mind and the right vision we can plan, and develop successful applications that don’t fade, because they are based on user needs, not trends.”
Aaron Irizarry (source)
Aarron Walter “Showing personality in your app, website, or brand can be a very powerful way for your audience to identify and empathize with you. People want to connect with real people and too often we forget that businesses are just collections of people. So why not let that shine through?”
Aarron Walter (source)
Alan Cooper “If we want users to like our software, we should design it to behave like a likeable person.”
Alan Cooper (source)
Alan Cooper “Most digital products today emerge from the development process like a monster emerging from a bubbling tank. Developers, instead of planning and executing with their users in mind, end up creating technological solutions over which they ultimately have little control. Like mad scientists, they fail because they have not imbued their creations with humanity.”
Alan Cooper (source)
Bill DeRouchey “How can companies better connect to its customers? The answer is simple: Speak like people, not like machines… More and more, people are craving authentic experiences from the world around them, and that means a simple human-to-human connection. In our ‘user experience’ world, this means when people use a website, software, product, etc., people should somehow experience the people that created it. Connection.”
Bill DeRouchey (source)
Brad Nunnally “Designers are gifted with a certain perspective of the world that can cause much frustration and wonderment. The average person doesn’t have the filters in place to see when they have been ignored by the product they are using. Occasionally, people can tell when something wasn’t designed, but they normally deal with the damages done physically, mentally, and socially. In an attempt to stop the pain, designers create interactions that look to discourage undesirable behavior and promote desirable behavior.”
Brad Nunnally (source)
Bruce Nussbaum “Design, in the end, is about creating better things for people. Along the way, it can generate better profits as well.”
Bruce Nussbaum (source)
Chris Hosmer “Design strategy is about serving people… The real challenge is in trying to solve the human problem. It’s about understanding their needs, their aspirations, and then meeting them in some way. So we are serving them. But sometimes their needs are to be surprised and delighted, and they can’t tell us how to surprise and delight them. That has to come from us as creative people in our profession.”
Chris Hosmer (source)
Dan Brown “Most [clients] expect experience design to be a discrete activity, solving all their problems with a single functional specification or a single research study. It must be an ongoing effort, a process of continually learning about users, responding to their behaviors, and evolving the product or service.”
Dan Brown (source)
Dan Saffer “Interaction design isn’t only about fixing problems; it’s also about facilitating interactions between people in richer, deeper, better ways – that is, finding new ways to better connect human beings to one another, and by doing so, make the world a better place to live”
Dan Saffer (source)
Dan Saffer “Interface design isn’t only about making a device or application look attractive… it’s about making an appropriately pleasing application or device that people find useful and usable and want to integrate into their lives.”
Dan Saffer (source)
Dan Saffer “Users will pay a premium for a better, higher quality product that does a better job serving their needs, for instance… A beautiful, easy to use object can often command a higher price, even if the manufacturing cost is the same.”
Dan Saffer (source)
Dana Chisnell “Whatever your team might call it-usability testing, design testing, getting feedback-the most effective input for informed design decisions is data about the behavior and performance of people using a design to reach their own goals.”
Dana Chisnell (source)
Dana Chisnell “Design is less and less about solving problems, testing less and less about eliminating frustration. It’s all becoming more and more about making a good experience for users… Now it’s not good enough to just be usable. The design has to fit into peoples’ lives. It actually has to make people happy, and anticipate their needs.”
Dana Chisnell (source)
Daniel Szuc “Doing a great job, playing a significant role in your company’s success, and providing ongoing value is about delivering great user experiences. It’s about how your work can add real value for both the business and the people who use your products… It’s about how you can keep design in focus.”
Daniel Szuc (source)
David Armano “What exactly does it mean to be a compassionate designer? It means doing things that help us not only understand, but relate to the users we design for. To feel for them. To put ourselves in their shoes, even if our own lives are totally opposite from them. Sound simple? It is. You just have to do it.”
David Armano (source)
David Sherwin “Natural elegance deals with the ‘feel’ a website or application expresses through its behavior over time, and which is rooted in the rules of order that govern nature… It’s possible to create perfectly pleasing websites by focusing only on formal, structural, and logical elegance. But those sites that embrace [natural] elegance feel to users like living beings who speak meaningful words; they are the marriage of form, function, pleasing content, and personal feeling.”
David Sherwin (source)
Demetrius Madrigal “Deeply understanding their customers is what allows successful companies to think five years ahead of the market and develop products and services that revolutionize the way we live our lives… By understanding the market and the needs of their customers, these companies can develop products customers want and put themselves in the best position to achieve success.”
Demetrius Madrigal (source)
Dmitry Dragilev “If you want your product to sell you have to start with focusing on transitions, wow moments, and endings to make it stick in a customer’s mind… You are not just making a product or providing a good user experience. You are giving people a story that will plant memories, and those memories will drive their behavior in the future. Make sure they have good ones.”
Dmitry Dragilev (source)
Don Norman “The world is complex, and so too must be the activities that we perform. But that doesn’t mean that we must live in continual frustration. No. The whole point of human-centered design is to tame complexity, to turn what would appear to be a complicated tool into one that fits the task, that is understandable, usable, enjoyable.”
Don Norman (source)
Don Norman “It is not enough that we build products that function, that are understandable and usable, we also need to build products that bring joy and excitement, pleasure and fun, and, yes, beauty to people’s lives.”
Don Norman (source)
Donna Spencer “Observe how your users approach information, consider what it means, and design to allow them to achieve what they need.”
Donna Spencer (source)
Eric Schaffer “While great usability is a baseline requirement, there is far more involved in engaging customers on a Web site than simply making sure they can find specific content and perform particular transactions. Today’s mandate is to move beyond traditional usability. Instead of designing only for what visitors can do on a site, superior Web design is now responsible for determining what customers will do.”
Eric Schaffer (source)
Francisco Inchauste “Storytelling offers a way for the team to really understand what they are building and the audience that they are creating it for. Stories allow for the most complex of ideas to be effectively conveyed to a variety of people. This designed product/experience can then offer meaning and emotion for its users.”
Francisco Inchauste (source)
Garr Reynolds “Good design must necessarily, in my opinion, have an impact on people’s lives, no matter how seemingly small. Good design changes things.”
Garr Reynolds (source)
Gentry Underwood “Human-centered approaches to industrial and interaction design have long focused on studying human behavior to create informed and appropriate designs. A social interaction designer must consider not only people, environment, and existing tools, but also the unseen elements of the system such as social relationships, power dynamics, and cultural rules.”
Gentry Underwood (source)
Jakob Nielsen “Good information architecture makes users less alienated and suppressed by technology. It simultaneously increases human satisfaction and your company’s profits. Very few jobs allow you to do both at the same time, so enjoy.”
Jakob Nielsen (source)
Jakob Nielsen “On the Web, usability is a necessary condition for survival. If a website is difficult to use, people leave. If the homepage fails to clearly state what a company offers and what users can do on the site, people leave. If users get lost on a website, they leave. If a website’s information is hard to read or doesn’t answer users’ key questions, they leave. Note a pattern here?”
Jakob Nielsen (source)
James P. Hackett “Design is a form of competitive advantage… Good design allows things to operate more efficiently, smoothly, and comfortably for the user… Customers appreciate good design. While they can’t necessarily point out what specifically makes it good, they know it feels better. There’s a visceral connection. They are willing to pay for it, if you give them a great experience.”
James P. Hackett (source)
Jared Spool “When creating great experiences, it’s not so much about doing what users expect. Instead, it’s about creating a design that clearly meets their needs at the instant they need it.”
Jared Spool (source)
Jay Greene “Design is really about the way products and services come to life. The companies that build the most enduring relationships with customers often do so by creating an environment where design flourishes. They have leadership that embraces design, executives who trust their gut and their employees as much as they trust all the data they receive abut their business. To really grasp design is to intuit what customers want, often before customers even know what they want it. That’s not something you can learn in a focus group or an online survey.”
Jay Greene (source)
Jeffrey Zeldman “Good web design is about the character of the content, not the character of the designer.”
Jeffrey Zeldman (source)
Jesse James Garrett “What I get to do is take that insight into how people think and how people behave and turn it into something, a product or a service, that is going to make their lives better. It’s going to improve their lives in some way that they may not even be able to articulate. To be able to make some small part of their experience better, and all of those little experiences add up to the sum of somebody’s life… the ability to touch people in that way is really profound.”
Jesse James Garrett (source)
Jesse James Garrett “What makes people passionate, pure and simple, is great experiences. If they have great experience with your product [and] they have great experiences with your service, they’re going to be passionate about your brand, they’re going to be committed to it. That’s how you build that kind of commitment.”
Jesse James Garrett (source)
Jesse James Garrett “[The responsibility of the designer] is to step out of their own perspective, to really exercise their empathy and really completely immerse themselves in the point of view, and the psychological state, of the person who will be using the product.”
Jesse James Garrett (source)
John Maeda “Technological advances have always been driven more by a mind-set of ‘I can’ than ‘I should’… Technologists love to cram maximum functionality into their products. That’s ‘I can’ thinking, which is driven by peer competition and market forces… But this approach ignores the far more important question of how the consumer will actually use the device… focus on what we should be doing, not just what we can.”
John Maeda (source)
Jon Kolko “Every design decision… contributes to the behavior of the masses, and helps define the culture of our society. This describes an enormous opportunity for designers, one that is rarely realized. We are, quite literally, building the culture around us; arguably, our effect is larger and more immediate than even policy decisions of our government. We are responsible for both the positive and negative repercussions of our design decisions, and these decisions have monumental repercussions.”
Jon Kolko (source)
Jono DiCarlo “When software is hard to use, don’t make excuses for it. Improve it. When a user makes a mistake, don’t blame the user. Ask how the software misled them. Then fix it. The user’s time is more valuable than ours. Respect it. Good UI design is humble.”
Jono DiCarlo (source)
Jono DiCarlo “When software is hard to use, don’t make excuses for it. Improve it. When a user makes a mistake, don’t blame the user. Ask how the software misled them. Then fix it. The user’s time is more valuable than ours. Respect it. Good UI design is humble.”
Jono DiCarlo (source)
Jono DiCarlo “When we blame the user, we teach them that technology is perfect and that the errors are their own. Because technology is hard to use, we are teaching a generation to be afraid of technology. We are teaching a generation to believe in their own stupidity… It’s not the user’s fault.”
Jono DiCarlo (source)
Joshua Brewer “Everything a designer does affects the user experience. From the purposeful addition of a design element to the negligent omission of crucial messaging, every decision is molding the future of the people we design for.”
Joshua Brewer (source)
Joshua Davis “We shouldn’t assume that the general viewing public is an idiot. We should try to evolve the medium by making intuitive systems that educate the user – not design to what level we think they can handle”
Joshua Davis (source)
Joshua Porter “People should never feel like a failure when using technology. Like the customer, the user is always right. If software crashes, it is the software designer’s fault. If someone can’t find something on a web site, it is the web designer’s fault… The big difference between good and bad designers is how they handle people struggling with their design. Technology serves humans. Humans do not serve technology.”
Joshua Porter (source)
Joshua Porter “As designers we must remember that behavior comes first. Always. The quirky, the obscure, the vain, the annoying, the wonderful. We need to observe human behavior if we are to support it in design.”
Joshua Porter (source)
Joshua Porter “More important than knowing all about the people we design for, we should have a deep understanding of the specific activity we’re supporting with our design… The most important question we can ask is not ‘who is using your software?’ but ‘what are people using your software doing?’.”
Joshua Porter (source)
Joshua Porter “Lorem Ipsum, wireframes, personas, etc are just tactics. The only thing that matters is: Do people love what you built?”
Joshua Porter (source)
Joshua Porter “UX is really just good marketing. It’s about knowing who your market is, knowing what is important to them, knowing why it is important to them, and designing accordingly. It’s also about listening after you’ve designed and adjusting to the changing marketplace: improving the experience of those in your market. It’s easy to recognize this when you consider that users = market. That’s what users are: your users are the market you’re designing for.”
Joshua Porter (source)
Kathy Sierra “Give users what they actually want, not what they say they want. And whatever you do, don’t give them new features just because your competitors have them!”
Kathy Sierra (source)
Kathy Sierra “If we want to create passionate users, we have to help them get better. Nobody’s passionate about things they suck at. If we can help them have richer, deeper, better experiences, we have a chance of making them passionate… If we could help our users be awesome, what would that mean to them?”
Kathy Sierra (source)
Larry Tesler “Enough confidence to believe you can solve any design problem and enough humility to understand that most of your initial ideas are probably bad. Enough humility to listen to ideas from other people that may be better than your own and enough confidence to understand that going with other people’s ideas does not diminish your value as a designer. True concern for the comfort and happiness of other people, including your users and your teammates.”
Larry Tesler (source)
Leisa Reichelt “Users don’t care about convention and heuristics and all of that. Users just want to have a good experience achieving the outcomes they set out to achieve in your site/system/product.  Surely we, as experience designers, can not only design a non-problematic experience. Surely we can actually create a pleasurable experience through the way that people interact with our content or functionality.”
Leisa Reichelt (source)
Leisa Reichelt “Don’t design for everyone. It’s impossible. All you end up doing is designing something that makes everyone unhappy.”
Leisa Reichelt (source)
Loren Baxter “It’s standard practice to design with our user’s goals in mind. Too often, though, we tend to focus only on the immediate goals… Although we may produce usable and successful designs, we have ignored the user’s larger context. They may be bored, tired, at work, grinding away at a long term deliverable. They may be entering countless rows of data into a spreadsheet.  People love to have fun. Without sacrificing usability, let’s bring a little fun into our designs.”
Loren Baxter (source)
Loren Baxter “It’s good to make people happy, but it’s better to help people make themselves happy. Design for strength.”
Loren Baxter (source)
Luke Wroblewski “Designers spend much of their time thinking through problems from the ‘outside in.’ Contrasted with the ‘inside out’ approaches that typify corporate business agendas, this methodology focuses on the perspective of customers and end users when analyzing and crafting solutions. Applying this perspective to strategic work creates more genuine relevance.”
Luke Wroblewski (source)
Marc Hassenzahl “UX is about technology that fulfils more than just instrumental needs in a way that acknowledges its use as a subjective, situated, complex and dynamic encounter. UX is a consequence of a user’s internal state, the characteristics of the designed system and the context within which the interaction occurs.”
Marc Hassenzahl (source)
Mark Hurst “The customers, the visitors, the patients, the readers, the guests, whatever you call them – their experience is what determines the company’s success or failure. So focus first on the overall experience. It’s strategic, not tactical. It’s about the people, not the tool. Focusing on the larger picture first will set a better context in which to work – later – on usability tactics.”
Mark Hurst (source)
Marty Neumeier “While market researchers describe how the world is, creative people describe how it could be. Their thinking is often so fresh that they zag even when they should zig. But without fresh thinking, there’s no chance of magic”
Marty Neumeier (source)
Michael Cummings “Paradoxically, when we advocate for the user within our product or service development teams, we are, in effect, simultaneously advocating for the team to our users.”
Michael Cummings (source)
Michelle Obama “What I love about design is the artistic and scientific complexity that also becomes useful… Great designers also pursue a mission. Great designers design with mankind in mind… The crossroads of science and art, innovation and inspiration are what I love about design.”
Michelle Obama (source)
Mike Kuniavsky “Your customers are not you. They don’t look like you, they don’t think like you, they don’t do the things that you do, they don’t have your expectations or assumptions. If they did, they wouldn’t be your customers; they’d be your competitors.”
Mike Kuniavsky (source)
Nick Finck “Too often we design our experiences for users as if they are a commodity rather than a human being. Things like greater conversion rates, increase in traffic, higher price per order, lower shopping cart abandonment, etc. and we lose sight of how to really treat the user with respect and a little bit of decency.”
Nick Finck (source)
Nick Finck “Businesses that have increased their investment in the customer experience over the past three years report higher customer referral rates and greater customer satisfaction.
Nick Finck (source)
Nielsen Norman Group “The first requirement for an exemplary user experience is to meet the exact needs of the customer, without fuss or bother. Next comes simplicity and elegance that produce products that are a joy to own, a joy to use. True user experience goes far beyond giving customers what they say they want, or providing checklist features.”
Nielsen Norman Group (source)
Niko Nyman “Be someone else. It takes great empathy to create a good experience. To create relevant experiences, you have to forget everything you know and design for others. Align with the expected patience, level of interest, and depth of knowledge of your users. Talk in the users’ language.”
Niko Nyman (source)
Nokia Design Manifesto “For a human being the product is not an end in itself but the gateway to a plethora of experiences.”
Nokia Design Manifesto (source)
Nokia Design Manifesto “Design has a social function and its true purpose is to improve people’s lives.”
Nokia Design Manifesto (source)
Paola Antonelli “People think that design is styling. Design is not style. It’s not about giving shape to the shell and not giving a damn about the guts. Good design is a renaissance attitude that combines technology, cognitive science, human need, and beauty to produce something that the world didn’t know it was missing.”
Paola Antonelli (source)
Paola Antonelli “Designers stand between revolutions and everyday life. They’re able to grasp momentous changes in technology, science, and society and convert those changes into objects and ideas that people can understand.”
Paola Antonelli (source)
Paul Boag “We all like to think of ourselves as user centric designers, but exactly how much effort do you put into knowing your users before beginning the design process? Take the time to really understand them the best you can… Understanding your users not only improves the quality of your work, but also helps move the discussion away from the personal preferences of the client, to the people who’s opinion really matters.”
Paul Boag (source)
Paul Seys “From a designers point of view at times it can be easy to focus too much on the little details and neglect the bigger things about how a user arrives at the site, what task are they looking to complete and how do they go about achieving their goal. It’s always worth asking yourself ‘have I done enough to help them?’”
Paul Seys (source)
Peter Merholz “When we’re trying to understand our ‘users’ and ‘customers,’ we have to remember that they’re people just like us, and just like us they regularly cross understood boundaries and categories… People are inconsistent, often inarticulate, and they challenge social and cultural boundaries in unexpected ways.”
Peter Merholz (source)
Peter Merholz “By going deep into our customers’ lives and closely observing their behaviors, you can wow them when you address needs that they’d never be able to articulate. By immersing yourself in the customer’s wider world of emotion and culture, you can wow them by attuning the offering to practical needs and dimensions of delight that normally go unfulfilled.”
Peter Merholz (source)
Peter Merholz “What’s more important than process is mindset. And when it comes to interaction design, that mindset is having empathy for and understanding your users, and creating something great for them.”
Peter Merholz (source)
Richard Rubinstein “In the absence of detailed information, we all work from assumptions about who the user is, what he or she does, and what type of system would meet his or her needs. Following these assumptions, we tend to design for ourselves, not for other people.”
Richard Rubinstein (source)
Robert Hoekman Jr. “Each moment has the potential to increase a user’s confidence or destroy his trust in a product or a company, and each one is an important piece of the whole experience. Why? Because the task a person is attempting to complete at any given moment is the most important task to that person, at that moment. It is our job to make sure nothing goes wrong. To make sure that moment is enjoyable and productive, and helps our user feel smart.”
Robert Hoekman Jr. (source)
Sarah Hanley “It’s not ‘user’ experience, it’s ‘people’ or ‘customer’ experience. The term ‘user’ can be a barrier to good design.”
Sarah Hanley (source)
Secil Watson “My definition of a ‘customer centric’ culture is where people are asking the right questions to the right people, who are able and willing to collaborate to provide their insights. In such a culture, over time, individuals ask the right questions more often and get the right answers more often. This is a reinforcing feedback loop. As this culture takes hold, more and more of the solutions coming out of the group would yield positive customer experiences.”
Secil Watson (source)
Sharon Lee “The principles of good human-to-computer interface design are simplicity, support, clarity, encouragement, satisfaction, accessibility, versatility, and personalization. While it’s essential to heed these, it’s also important to empathize with and inspire your audience so they feel you’re treating them less like a faceless user and more like a human being.”
Sharon Lee (source)
Simone LeAmon “For me the most compelling aspect of design is developing a concept that communicates to the client and respective audience/market. Design is an opportunity to connect with people, listen to their needs and deliver experiences which reflect positively on society and of course the designer. Design should inspire peoples and cultures to grow, transform and look to the future.”
Simone LeAmon (source)
Steve Jobs “Our DNA is as a consumer company – for that individual customer who’s voting thumbs up or thumbs down. That’s who we think about. And we think that our job is to take responsibility for the complete user experience. And if it’s not up to par, it’s our fault, plain and simply.”
Steve Jobs (source)
Susan Weinschenk “The secret to designing an intuitive user experience is making sure that the conceptual model of your product matches, as much as possible, the mental models of your users. If you get that right you will have created a positive and useful user experience.”
Susan Weinschenk (source)
Ted Booth “Coming up with an idea is really just the beginning. It’s the crafting of the idea into a real, working thing that is a truly exciting experience. Making an idea come alive, into something that makes sense, is then made and put into the market, and then connects with people in a meaningful way-that’s the hard part.”
Ted Booth (source)
Terry Winograd “All new technologies develop within the background of a tacit understanding of human nature and human work. The use of technology in turn leads to fundamental changes in what we do, and ultimately in turn what it is to be human. We encounter the deep questions of design when we recognize that in designing tools we are designing ways of being.”
Terry Winograd (source)
Thomas Mann “People’s behavior makes sense if you think about it in terms of their goals, needs, and motives.”
Thomas Mann (source)
Timothy Smith “Users should feel comfortable when they visit your site. They should feel that your site is designed, arranged and filled with logical information that they know how to get to. When you are consistent you make your users happy which will compel them to return.”
Timothy Smith (source)
Tyler Hilker “It is not enough to create and understand powerful systems; you must understand how other people understand your system and confine their interaction–or educate them–to appropriate complexity.”
Tyler Hilker (source)
Walt Disney “You can design and create, and build the most wonderful place in the world. But it takes people to make the dream a reality”
Walt Disney (source)
Whitney Hess “Most people believe that User Experience is just about finding the best solution for your users–but it’s not. UX is about defining the problem that needs to be solved (the why), defining the types of people who need it to be solved (the who), and defining the way in which it should be solved to be relevant to those people (the how).”
Whitney Hess (source)
Whitney Quesenbery “Saying that people are the focus of user experience is stating the obvious, but when we are deeply engaged in our own work as user experience designers, it can be difficult to constantly remember to keep people at the center of design. For most of us, it’s hard not to get caught up in the skills and techniques that the technologies we work with require and even harder not to want to use technology to solve problems. But as user experience designers, we need to keep our eye on people.”
Whitney Quesenbery (source)
Whitney Quesenbery “I view a user experience as a conversation between people separated over the distance of time. At one end of that conversation are those who create the product; at the other, the people who use it. In between is the product itself–with a design that either helps or hinders; creates a barrier-free interaction or shouts in an unfamiliar language. Because this conversation does not happen in real time, we are not there to smooth over the rough spots and make sure that we have spoken clearly. Instead, we have to build our understanding of those users into every aspect of the design, by putting people–users–at the center of the design process.”
Whitney Quesenbery (source)
Zeus Jones “There will always be a need for dialogue, and if we are to have a meaningful conversation with our users, we have to facilitate the conversation with an interface that welcomes them with open arms… By asking users to engage on a personal level, we are creating a relationship based on shared ownership of knowledge and value. And best of all, it doesn’t feel like work. Actions really do speak louder than words.”
Zeus Jones (source)