If you want your product to sell, focus on memorable experiences

“If you want your product to sell you have to start with focusing on transitions, wow moments, and endings to make it stick in a customer’s mind… You are not just making a product or providing a good user experience. You are giving people a story that will plant memories, and those memories will drive their behavior in the future. Make sure they have good ones.” – Dmitry Dragilev

Read more in Dmitry’s TechCrunch article “Memory Inception: Three Keys To Creating A Great User Experience For Your Product.”

Using Multiple Data Sources and Insights to Aid Design

Using Multiple Data Sources and Insights to Aid Design

Often when we think of using data to influence our designs, we think of “data” in a very narrow way.  When trying to identify opportunities or support our design decisions with evidence, some gravitate solely towards web analytics or conversion data, others only to research findings in lab studies.  Some shy away from the thought of “data-driven design” (usually with the exception of qualitative research) in fear that our UX expertise can be overwritten by automated experimentation and optimization. However, data that you gather shouldn’t be treated in isolation and it doesn’t have to be seen as an opposing force to design.  When used properly, multiple data sources can be joined together to generate powerful insights that will help us make our products and services better.

Design products that appeal to both cognition and emotion for a competitive advantage

“Products were once designed for the functions they performed. But when all companies can make products that perform their functions equally well, the distinctive advantage goes to those who provide pleasure and enjoyment while maintaining the power. If functions are equated with cognition, pleasure is equated with emotion; today we want products that appeal to both cognition and emotion.” – Don Norman

Read more in Don’s Interactions Magazine article “The Transmedia Design Challenge Technology that is Pleasurable and Satisfying.”

SXSW Voting Request (Shameless Plug)

It’s that time of year again, SXSW PanelPicker voting time! I know how annoying it can be to receive endless requests for votes, so I apologize in advance for contributing to the bombardment.  The fact is, though, that with the public’s vote contributing 30% to the final speaker decision, and with 2,347 panels to choose from in the voting, posts like these help draw your attention to proposals that may get lost in the crowd.

Note that in order to vote, you will need to create an account. It only takes a few minutes.

My SXSW Presentation Proposal

This is my first time submitting a proposal to SXSW.  I decided to submit a proposal based on a recent blog post (“Challenging Conventional Assumptions about User Experience Design“). Below is a short description of the presentation. If the topic intrigues you, click on the thumb to vote, or the title to view more details.

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Stop solving interaction design problems and begin solving problems with design

“As designers of interactions broaden their perspective and take a higher level view of the problem, they simultaneously make another transition: they stop solving interaction design problems and begin solving problems with design… In this capacity designers of interactions bring their design skills to bear on truly complex, systemic problems—broad in scale and scope—and have the opportunity to affect truly profound and lasting change.” – Steve Baty

This quote is from Steve’s Core77 article “The Strategic Arc of Interaction Design: Moving Towards Holistic System Design.

User Experience is about more than just finding the best solution for your users

“Most people believe that User Experience is just about finding the best solution for your users — but it’s not. UX is about defining the problem that needs to be solved (the why), defining the types of people who need it to be solved (the who), and defining the way in which it should be solved to be relevant to those people (the how).” – Whitney Hess

Read more in Whitney’s great 52 Weeks of UX article “StartUXs.