Begin any design project with the mindset of “I don’t know what I don’t know”

“I think if you’re starting out early in the process by talking about your ideas for solutions, you’re already not listening. I think you need to enter into any design project with that zen learner’s mind of ‘I don’t know what I don’t know.’” - Kim Goodwin

“I think if you’re starting out early in the process by talking about your ideas for solutions, you’re already not listening. I think you need to enter into any design project with that zen learner’s mind of ‘I don’t know what I don’t know.’” – Kim Goodwin

Hear more from Kim Goodwin on “Excelling at Interaction Design” in this podcast from Jared Spool.

Collaborating to provide insights can lead to positive customer experiences

“My definition of a ‘customer centric’ culture is where people are asking the right questions to the right people, who are able and willing to collaborate to provide their insights. In such a culture, over time, individuals ask the right questions more often and get the right answers more often. This is a reinforcing feedback loop. As this culture takes hold, more and more of the solutions coming out of the group would yield positive customer experiences.” - Secil Watson

“My definition of a ‘customer centric’ culture is where people are asking the right questions to the right people, who are able and willing to collaborate to provide their insights. In such a culture, over time, individuals ask the right questions more often and get the right answers more often. This is a reinforcing feedback loop. As this culture takes hold, more and more of the solutions coming out of the group would yield positive customer experiences.” – Secil Watson

Read more from Secil in Richard Anderson’s Riander Blog entry “Breaking Silos.” Secil describes why collaboration and integrated work practices are critical to the success of any team.

Focus on the experience that the products you design engender

“Ultimately, we are deluding ourselves if we think that the products that we design are the ‘things’ that we sell, rather than the individual, social and cultural experience that they engender, and the value and impact that they have. Design that ignores this is not worthy of the name.” - Bill Buxton's "personal mantra"

“Ultimately, we are deluding ourselves if we think that the products that we design are the ‘things’ that we sell, rather than the individual, social and cultural experience that they engender, and the value and impact that they have. Design that ignores this is not worthy of the name.” – Bill Buxton’s “personal mantra”

Bill Buxton’s personal mantra is cited on his website. Visit his site to learn more about his recent work or his upcoming talks and events. Read more from Bill in his book Sketching User Experiences.

UX strategy requires the coordinated efforts of the entire organization

“User experience is something that cuts right across the organization. It is the tangible manifestation of the organization’s reason for being, translating the brand values into a series of identifiable and actionable experience characteristics. To execute a UX strategy requires the coordinated efforts of the entire organization, and, as such, should sit close to the centre of the organization’s overall strategy.” - Steve Baty

“User experience is something that cuts right across the organization. It is the tangible manifestation of the organization’s reason for being, translating the brand values into a series of identifiable and actionable experience characteristics. To execute a UX strategy requires the coordinated efforts of the entire organization, and, as such, should sit close to the centre of the organization’s overall strategy.” – Steve Baty

Read an interview with Steve Baty “UX Strategy: defining and executing strategies for your UX projects and UX teams” for more thoughts on the importance of UX strategy within an organization.

The alternative to good design is bad design, not no design at all

“Questions about whether design is necessary or affordable are quite beside the point: design is inevitable. The alternative to good design is bad design, not no design at all.” - Book Design: A Practical Introduction by Douglas Martin

“Questions about whether design is necessary or affordable are quite beside the point: design is inevitable. The alternative to good design is bad design, not no design at all.” – Book Design: A Practical Introduction by Douglas Martin

Purchase Douglas’ book “Book Design: A Practical Introduction” here.

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