Monthly Archives: October 2009

Focus on understanding the behavior and performance of people using a design

“Whatever your team might call it—usability testing, design testing, getting feedback—the most effective input for informed design decisions is data about the behavior and performance of people using a design to reach their own goals.” - Dana Chisnell

“Whatever your team might call it—usability testing, design testing, getting feedback—the most effective input for informed design decisions is data about the behavior and performance of people using a design to reach their own goals.” – Dana Chisnell

This quote is from Dana’s article “Usability Testing Demystified.”

Designers have to be open to the changes that technology is making in our discipline

“I think that we, as designers, have to be completely open to the changes that technology is making in our discipline... as designers we need to be first in line to try the new technologies so that we can use the new technologies more to our advantage than to our detriment." - Debbie Millman

“I think that we, as designers, have to be completely open to the changes that technology is making in our discipline… as designers we need to be first in line to try the new technologies so that we can use the new technologies more to our advantage than to our detriment.” – Debbie Millman

Hear more from AIGA President Debbie Millman on the need for designers who are generally print focused to be open to new technologies.

A work of art is realized when form and content are indistinguishable

“A work of art is realized when form and content are indistinguishable. When they are in synthesis. In other words, when they fuse. When form predominates, meaning is blunted... When content predominates, interest lags.” - Paul Rand

“A work of art is realized when form and content are indistinguishable. When they are in synthesis. In other words, when they fuse. When form predominates, meaning is blunted… When content predominates, interest lags.” – Paul Rand

This quote is from an interview by Preston McLanahan who interviewed Paul Rand in 1996.  Watch a clip from this interview here.

“Because it sucks” is not a reason to redesign.

“‘Because it sucks’ is not a reason to redesign. ‘It sucks’ leaves the scope wide open with no measure of success. It’s a sure way to scrap the good decisions you made along with the mistakes. Instead, start the redesign with a question: ‘What is right about this design?’ Use that perspective to identify specific problems and then target those exact problems.” - Ryan Singer

“‘Because it sucks’ is not a reason to redesign. ‘It sucks’ leaves the scope wide open with no measure of success. It’s a sure way to scrap the good decisions you made along with the mistakes. Instead, start the redesign with a question: ‘What is right about this design?’ Use that perspective to identify specific problems and then target those exact problems.” – Ryan Singer

Ryan’s quote is from the 37signals blog “Signal vs. Noise.”

New technology is likely to make the least improvement in the ease of use of products

“Ironically, the thing that will likely make the least improvement in the ease of use of software-based products is new technology. There is little difference technically between a complicated, confusing program and a simple, fun, and powerful product.” - Alan Cooper

“Ironically, the thing that will likely make the least improvement in the ease of use of software-based products is new technology. There is little difference technically between a complicated, confusing program and a simple, fun, and powerful product.” – Alan Cooper

This quote is from Alan’s book “The Inmates are Running the Asylum.” This quote was also mentioned in Interaction-Design.org’s quote of the day.

Creating visual imagery is a state of mind

“Creating visual imagery is a state of mind. It involves the reproduction of what we see. But much more than that, it becomes an outlet to express feelings about what we experience.” - Tracy Sabin

“Creating visual imagery is a state of mind. It involves the reproduction of what we see. But much more than that, it becomes an outlet to express feelings about what we experience.” – Tracy Sabin

This quote is from Catherine Fishel’s book “401 design meditations.”