Simply using Web 2.0 technologies does not guarantee an optimal experience

“The Web 2.0 architecture still needs much work... As Spiderman’s Uncle Ben pointed out, ‘With great power comes great responsibility.’ Just because we can do all these [Web 2.0] things doesn’t mean we should do them... [It is easy to] imagine designers going wild with the capabilities of this new technology and not using the restraint necessary to ensure they produce an optimal experience.” - Jared Spool

“The Web 2.0 architecture still needs much work… As Spiderman’s Uncle Ben pointed out, ‘With great power comes great responsibility.’ Just because we can do all these [Web 2.0] things doesn’t mean we should do them… [It is easy to] imagine designers going wild with the capabilities of this new technology and not using the restraint necessary to ensure they produce an optimal experience.” – Jared Spool

This quote is from Jared’s article “Web 2.0: The Power Behind the Hype.” Quote submitted by my Vanguard coworker, Brian Nothacker.

Special thanks to Whitney Hess for including inspireUX in her blogs.com listing of the 10 Best UX (User Experience) Design Blogs! It is quite an honor to be included among so many excellent contributors to the field.

Catriona Cornett

I am a User Experience Designer with a passion for making people’s lives better through design. I have helped over a dozen organizations obtain a competitive advantage by delivering great user experiences across desktop, mobile, tablet and other channels.

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  • http://blog.rainer.eschen.name rainwebs

    If you’re an experienced desktop developer you know that it is absurd to think that even with the best Web 2.0 technologies based on AJAX you will ever reach the quality of a desktop application design. What should be the minimum anyway. You don’t have the controls for this. So, you can try to reach something similar, but to go this way is pretty exhausting.

    If you take Flex you can have a look at the “old” styleguides from the desktop and may have a 90% solution. So, the real problem is how good can I imitate the desktop to get something that has a user experience we can start to talk about.

    But, even then I wonder why we still have nothing better. The desktop metaphor is almost 40 years old (prototypes at PARC, 1969). How many centuries is this in computer years?