Monthly Archives: December 2008

Without sacrificing usability, let’s bring a little fun into our designs

“It’s standard practice to design with our user’s goals in mind. Too often, though, we tend to focus only on the immediate goals... Although we may produce usable and successful designs, we have ignored the user’s larger context. They may be bored, tired, at work, grinding away at a long term deliverable. They may be entering countless rows of data into a spreadsheet.  People love to have fun. Without sacrificing usability, let’s bring a little fun into our designs.” - Loren Baxter

“It’s standard practice to design with our user’s goals in mind. Too often, though, we tend to focus only on the immediate goals… Although we may produce usable and successful designs, we have ignored the user’s larger context. They may be bored, tired, at work, grinding away at a long term deliverable. They may be entering countless rows of data into a spreadsheet.  People love to have fun. Without sacrificing usability, let’s bring a little fun into our designs.” – Loren Baxter

Read Loren’s article “Fun in Interaction Design” here.

Effective information architects make the complex clear

“Effective information architects make the complex clear; they make the information understandable to other human beings. If they succeed in doing that, they’re good information architects. If they fail, they’re not.” – Information Anxiety 2 by Richard Wurman

Purchase Richard’s book Information Anxiety 2 or read a select chapter from the book for his thoughts on how information architects can open themselves to being able to explain information to others.

Plain language is part of user-centered design

“Good writing for the web is about creating communications in which people can find what they need, understand what they find, and act appropriately on that understanding in the time and effort that they think it is worth. Plain language is part of user-centered design.” - Ginny Redish

“Good writing for the web is about creating communications in which people can find what they need, understand what they find, and act appropriately on that understanding in the time and effort that they think it is worth.  Plain language is part of user-centered design.” – Ginny Redish

Read more about Ginny and the importance of plain language on the web in Whitney Quesenbery’s article “Usability doesn’t stop when you write the content.”

The success of an experience is measured by the amount of happiness it brings

“The ultimate aim of all creative activity is to bring happiness to people’s lives... The success of an experience is measured by the amount of happiness it brings to life and the amount of people willing to live the experience, not by its individual qualities.” - Andrë Braz

“The ultimate aim of all creative activity is to bring happiness to people’s lives… The success of an experience is measured by the amount of happiness it brings to life and the amount of people willing to live the experience, not by its individual qualities.” – Andrë Braz

Read Andrë’s “Experience Design Manifesto” here.

Take the time to really understand your users the best you can

“We all like to think of ourselves as user centric designers, but exactly how much effort do you put into knowing your users before beginning the design process? Take the time to really understand them the best you can... Understanding your users not only improves the quality of your work, but also helps move the discussion away from the personal preferences of the client, to the people who’s opinion really matters.” - Paul Boag

“We all like to think of ourselves as user centric designers, but exactly how much effort do you put into knowing your users before beginning the design process? Take the time to really understand them the best you can… Understanding your users not only improves the quality of your work, but also helps move the discussion away from the personal preferences of the client, to the people who’s opinion really matters.” – Paul Boag

Read Paul’s article “10 Ways To Get Design Approval” for his thoughts on how you can help to ensure that the design you produce is the one that gets built.

Innovation lies at the heart of both better design and better business

“Innovation lies at the heart of both better design and better business. It magnifies drive inside the organization. It slashes the costs of inefficiency, duplication, and corporate ennui. It confers the ability to produce uncommon, yet practical, responses to real problems.” - The Brand Gap by Marty Neumeier

“Innovation lies at the heart of both better design and better business. It magnifies drive inside the organization. It slashes the costs of inefficiency, duplication, and corporate ennui. It confers the ability to produce uncommon, yet practical, responses to real problems.” – The Brand Gap by Marty Neumeier

Check out Marty’s book The Brand Gap for his thoughts on how to bridge the distance between business strategy and design.