Monthly Archives: December 2008

In design, space is not the problem. Attention is.

“Designing a website can be a bit like being a kid and inheriting a sweetshop. It’s easy to get carried away. There are so many choices. A website can be like an attic that never fills up. Space is not the problem. Attention is.” - Gerry McGovern

“Designing a website can be a bit like being a kid and inheriting a sweetshop. It’s easy to get carried away. There are so many choices. A website can be like an attic that never fills up. Space is not the problem. Attention is.” – Gerry McGovern

This quote is from Gerry’s article “Web navigation is about moving forward”.

Making assumptions about our users leads us to design for ourselves

“In the absence of detailed information, we all work from assumptions about who the user is, what he or she does, and what type of system would meet his or her needs. Following these assumptions, we tend to design for ourselves, not for other people.” - Human Factor: Designing Computer Systems for People by Richard Rubinstein and Harry Hersh

“In the absence of detailed information, we all work from assumptions about who the user is, what he or she does, and what type of system would meet his or her needs. Following these assumptions, we tend to design for ourselves, not for other people.” – Human Factor: Designing Computer Systems for People by Richard Rubinstein and Harry Hersh

Quote submitted by Kel Smith.  Do you have a quote you want to see on inspireUX? Submit it, and it may be chosen!

Purchase Human Factor: Designing Computer Systems for People here.

UX is a conversation between people separated over the distance of time

“I view a user experience as a conversation between people separated over the distance of time. At one end of that conversation are those who create the product; at the other, the people who use it. In between is the product itself—with a design that either helps or hinders; creates a barrier-free interaction or shouts in an unfamiliar language. Because this conversation does not happen in real time, we are not there to smooth over the rough spots and make sure that we have spoken clearly. Instead, we have to build our understanding of those users into every aspect of the design, by putting people—users—at the center of the design process.” - Whitney Quesenbery

“I view a user experience as a conversation between people separated over the distance of time. At one end of that conversation are those who create the product; at the other, the people who use it. In between is the product itself—with a design that either helps or hinders; creates a barrier-free interaction or shouts in an unfamiliar language. Because this conversation does not happen in real time, we are not there to smooth over the rough spots and make sure that we have spoken clearly. Instead, we have to build our understanding of those users into every aspect of the design, by putting people—users—at the center of the design process.” – Whitney Quesenbery

This quote is from Whitney’s great article “Why People Matter” from UX Matters.

Tip: Remember, you can always click on the thumbnail image of the quote card to get a full-sized image that can be used for saving or printing.

Design thinking is a catalyst for innovation productivity

“Organizations need to take design thinking seriously. We need to spend more time making people conscious of design thinking — not because design is wondrous or magical, but simply because by focusing on it, we’ll make it better. And that’s an imperative for any business, because design thinking is indisputably a catalyst for innovation productivity.” - Tim Brown

“Organizations need to take design thinking seriously. We need to spend more time making people conscious of design thinking — not because design is wondrous or magical, but simply because by focusing on it, we’ll make it better. And that’s an imperative for any business, because design thinking is indisputably a catalyst for innovation productivity.” – Tim Brown

Read Tim’s article “Strategy by Design” from Fast Company.

Happy holidays to all inspireUX readers!

The worst misstep one can make in design is to solve the wrong problem

“The worst misstep one can make in design is to solve the wrong problem.” – John Carroll

This quote was cited in Malcolm MCullough’s book “Digital Ground: Architecture, Pervasive Computing, and Environmental Knowing.” Read an excerpt from this book that includes John Carroll’s quote.

Also, you can read more about John Carroll (who, I might add, is a professor at my Alma Mater, Penn State’s College of Information Sciences and Technology) in this interview from UX Pioneers.

The measure of quality in web design should be graceful transformation

“The measure of quality in web design should not be good looks, but graceful transformation: pages that can be accessed under different conditions and keep their integrity... A real web designer embraces the medium and designs for maximum inclusivity.” - Sarah Horton

“The measure of quality in web design should not be good looks, but graceful transformation: pages that can be accessed under different conditions and keep their integrity… A real web designer embraces the medium and designs for maximum inclusivity.” – Sarah Horton

Read Sarah’s article “Beauty is Only Screen Deep” for her thoughts on why design should be about more than just good looks.